THE WRIGHT INSTITUTE PRESENTS:
Please contact us in advance if you require special accommodations on the day of the event.
Adult Attachment in
Romantic Relationships:
Overcoming the Fear of Love
Course Level: Intermediate
Saturday, February 7, 2015
9:00am-4:00pm
Fees: Free for WI
Faculty/Staff/Pro
Bono Collaborative
Supervisors/Students
(space permitting)
WI Alums: $90
Non WI Students: $60
General: $150
Instructor: Lisa Firestone, PhD
Location: First Presbyterian Church of Berkeley
Geneva Hall, 1st Floor, Calvin Room
2407 Dana Street, Berkeley, CA 94704
To Register: www.wi.edu/continuing-education
Contact: The Wright Institute Continuing Education
Phone: 510-841-9230 x114, Email: Julie@wi.edu
Credits: 6 CE hours. The Wright Institute is approved by the American Psychological
Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Wright Institute
maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION:
Both clinicians and researchers have noted the importance of close interpersonal
relationships for the development of personality, character, and overall well-being.
Attachment patterns formed early in life influence our relationships throughout our lives,
most particularly our romantic relationships.
What prevents most people from being able to sustain romantic, meaningful relationships
that satisfy their needs and desires? Why do people often feel compelled to punish those
closest to them? What are the factors that determine whether partners will end up
experiencing love and fulfillment in their relationship or suffering pain and distress? This
workshop helps answer these questions by providing participants with a theoretical model
that integrates psychodynamic, existential, and family systems frameworks in a manner
that can increase clinicians’ understanding of and ability to assist individuals in developing
and maintaining intimacy in their relationships.
Unlike many psychoanalytic theories, attachment theory has been vigorously researched
during the past 35 years. Researchers have identified some notable (and measurable)
patterns of attachment: secure, anxious, and avoidant.